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The legacy of 'W'?

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Old 07-17-2007, 12:46 PM   #301
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

Amen

Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution states:
The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Essentially, a resolution to initiate impeachment proceedings is initiated in the House of Reps and forwarded to a committee for review. If the committee believes grounds for impeachment exist, it drafts articles of impeachment and submits them to the full House for approval. If passed by a majority vote, the Articles are then sent to the Senate which conducts a trial where the Senators sit as the judges and the Representatives act as the "prosecutor". Conviction takes a two-thirds vote of the entire Senate.

Clinton and Johnson were both impeached but aquitted.
Nixon resigned before being impeached. The impeachment process had begun as the House Judiciary Committee had recommended charges but the formal impeachment had not been approved by the House. Nixon deemed (correctly) that both the impeachment and subsequent conviction as inevitable and resigned instead.

Actual impeachments of only the following seventeen federal officers have taken place:

Two presidents: Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, both acquitted.
One cabinet officer, acquitted after he had resigned.
One senator
Thirteen federal judges, including Associate Justice Samuel Chase in 1805, seven of whom were convicted (after his conviction, former judge Alcee Hastings was elected as a member of the House of Representatives).

See Impeachment in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-17-2007, 01:22 PM   #302
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

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Originally Posted by JoeRedskin View Post
Amen

Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution states:
The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Essentially, a resolution to initiate impeachment proceedings is initiated in the House of Reps and forwarded to a committee for review. If the committee believes grounds for impeachment exist, it drafts articles of impeachment and submits them to the full House for approval. If passed by a majority vote, the Articles are then sent to the Senate which conducts a trial where the Senators sit as the judges and the Representatives act as the "prosecutor". Conviction takes a two-thirds vote of the entire Senate.

Clinton and Johnson were both impeached but aquitted.
Nixon resigned before being impeached. The impeachment process had begun as the House Judiciary Committee had recommended charges but the formal impeachment had not been approved by the House. Nixon deemed (correctly) that both the impeachment and subsequent conviction as inevitable and resigned instead.

Actual impeachments of only the following seventeen federal officers have taken place:

Two presidents: Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, both acquitted.
One cabinet officer, acquitted after he had resigned.
One senator
Thirteen federal judges, including Associate Justice Samuel Chase in 1805, seven of whom were convicted (after his conviction, former judge Alcee Hastings was elected as a member of the House of Representatives).

See Impeachment in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Good post, thanks Joe.
Still makes you wonder why Bush has not gone through this. I guess he's not as bad as people say.
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Old 07-17-2007, 01:30 PM   #303
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

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Originally Posted by angryssg View Post
FYI. The wiggle your big toe comment from Kill Bill was actually a Quote from FDR after he was recovering from poliomyelitis. Just thought you might find that interesting.
Never saw Kill Bill...or Kill Bill 2.
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Old 07-17-2007, 03:47 PM   #304
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

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Originally Posted by JoeRedskin View Post
Amen

Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution states:
The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Essentially, a resolution to initiate impeachment proceedings is initiated in the House of Reps and forwarded to a committee for review. If the committee believes grounds for impeachment exist, it drafts articles of impeachment and submits them to the full House for approval. If passed by a majority vote, the Articles are then sent to the Senate which conducts a trial where the Senators sit as the judges and the Representatives act as the "prosecutor". Conviction takes a two-thirds vote of the entire Senate.

Clinton and Johnson were both impeached but aquitted.
Nixon resigned before being impeached. The impeachment process had begun as the House Judiciary Committee had recommended charges but the formal impeachment had not been approved by the House. Nixon deemed (correctly) that both the impeachment and subsequent conviction as inevitable and resigned instead.

Actual impeachments of only the following seventeen federal officers have taken place:

Two presidents: Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, both acquitted.
One cabinet officer, acquitted after he had resigned.
One senator
Thirteen federal judges, including Associate Justice Samuel Chase in 1805, seven of whom were convicted (after his conviction, former judge Alcee Hastings was elected as a member of the House of Representatives).

See Impeachment in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
My bad. Thanks for setting me straight, JR and SS.
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Old 07-17-2007, 10:12 PM   #305
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

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Originally Posted by JoeRedskin View Post
Amen

Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution states:
The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Essentially, a resolution to initiate impeachment proceedings is initiated in the House of Reps and forwarded to a committee for review. If the committee believes grounds for impeachment exist, it drafts articles of impeachment and submits them to the full House for approval. If passed by a majority vote, the Articles are then sent to the Senate which conducts a trial where the Senators sit as the judges and the Representatives act as the "prosecutor". Conviction takes a two-thirds vote of the entire Senate.

Clinton and Johnson were both impeached but aquitted.
Nixon resigned before being impeached. The impeachment process had begun as the House Judiciary Committee had recommended charges but the formal impeachment had not been approved by the House. Nixon deemed (correctly) that both the impeachment and subsequent conviction as inevitable and resigned instead.

Actual impeachments of only the following seventeen federal officers have taken place:

Two presidents: Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, both acquitted.
One cabinet officer, acquitted after he had resigned.
One senator
Thirteen federal judges, including Associate Justice Samuel Chase in 1805, seven of whom were convicted (after his conviction, former judge Alcee Hastings was elected as a member of the House of Representatives).

See Impeachment in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Well stated, but trying to explain this is like shoveling fleas. In two pages someone else will make an incorrect statement related to impeachment. I made a similar if less eloquent post on the first page of another thread and there were 3 subsequent pages of argument about the process.

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Old 07-18-2007, 01:08 PM   #306
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

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Well stated, but trying to explain this is like shoveling fleas. In two pages someone else will make an incorrect statement related to impeachment. I made a similar if less eloquent post on the first page of another thread and there were 3 subsequent pages of argument about the process.

If it's a pile of dead fleas, should be fairly easy!
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:27 PM   #307
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

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Originally Posted by 70Chip View Post
Well stated, but trying to explain this is like shoveling fleas. In two pages someone else will make an incorrect statement related to impeachment. I made a similar if less eloquent post on the first page of another thread and there were 3 subsequent pages of argument about the process.
If in two pages someone else makes an incorrect statement about impeachment, it won't be me. Even if only one person learns something, it is not worthless.
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Old 07-19-2007, 10:33 PM   #308
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

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Good post, thanks Joe.
Still makes you wonder why Bush has not gone through this. I guess he's not as bad as people say.

Bush hasn't gone through it because Republicans are protecting him in Congress; and because Pelosi wants to keep Bush as President to the end of his term. She thinks that keeping this Republican administration in office until the next election will ensure Democratic wins in both houses as well as a democratic president.
Their thinking is probably sound. There's enough scandal and imcompetence in the administration to roast Republicans for the next year and a half and then some.
Consistent with this, the dems fear that Republicans may make a come back if Bush and his administration are out the picture.
The irony is that, in the last analysis, Bush will probably not be impeached because he is as bad as they say. Republicans have to stay with him because their roles in supporting Bush in illegal acts in the past will become extremely damaging to them if there is a trial. As for the Democrats, they want to keep this thing going because they think Republicans will end up destroying themselves under Bush for decades.
Whatever, Bush is being spared for now because of the political plans of both parties, not because he hasn't deserved impeachment and conviction.
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Old 07-20-2007, 12:45 AM   #309
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Re: The legacy of 'W'?

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Bush hasn't gone through it because Republicans are protecting him in Congress; and because Pelosi wants to keep Bush as President to the end of his term. She thinks that keeping this Republican administration in office until the next election will ensure Democratic wins in both houses as well as a democratic president.
Their thinking is probably sound. There's enough scandal and imcompetence in the administration to roast Republicans for the next year and a half and then some.
Consistent with this, the dems fear that Republicans may make a come back if Bush and his administration are out the picture.
The irony is that, in the last analysis, Bush will probably not be impeached because he is as bad as they say. Republicans have to stay with him because their roles in supporting Bush in illegal acts in the past will become extremely damaging to them if there is a trial. As for the Democrats, they want to keep this thing going because they think Republicans will end up destroying themselves under Bush for decades.
Whatever, Bush is being spared for now because of the political plans of both parties, not because he hasn't deserved impeachment and conviction.
Those are actually very good points.
I would still like to think that enough people hate Bush to try it, but your points make sense.
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