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-   -   How do you like your tax money spent? (http://www.thewarpath.net/debating-with-the-enemy/49159-how-do-you-like-your-tax.html)

Chico23231 09-05-2012 09:47 AM

How do you like your tax money spent?
 
Give some examples of waste, fraud, and down right stupidity


[url=http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/04/health/massachusetts-sex-change-surgery-inmate/index.html?hpt=hp_t3]Massachusetts judge rules for inmate's sex-change surgery - CNN.com[/url]

An amazing article of waste, just a damn disgrace.

firstdown 09-05-2012 10:28 AM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
This is just a fine example how gov. is just too big and has too much of our money.

Chico23231 09-05-2012 10:43 AM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
I laugh at the empathy the judge and the commonwealth display with the ruling. Never mind the fact this MAN was found guilty of killing his wife and serving a life sentence...poor guy. I would stipulate, ok you can have the procedure only if he pays for the entire operation. No way the state should pay for this, its criminal.

NC_Skins 09-06-2012 07:20 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
[quote=Chico23231;936909]No way the state should pay for this, its criminal.[/quote]

Agree. Unless it's a life saving procedure, I'm 100% against the state (or federal) government paying for this.

firstdown 09-06-2012 07:53 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
Give him a pu$$y and then throw him in a cell with 50 guys serving a life.

los panda 09-06-2012 07:56 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
close your eyes for a moment and imagine what this country would be like if laws/policies/etc. were based on common sense

HailGreen28 09-06-2012 11:07 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
This part blew my mind:

Chief Judge Mark L. Wolf ruled that sex reassignment surgery is the "only adequate treatment" for Kosilek, and "that there is no less intrusive means to correct the prolonged violation of Kosilek's Eighth Amendment right to adequate medical care."

This is Amendment 8 - Cruel and Unusual Punishment: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted."

How did the state violate Koslek's 8th amendment rights? "Adequate medical care" seems like a major reach for something so... elective. By elective I mean the surgery, not even arguing whether gender preference is really elective or not.

Trying to think of an example on how ridiculous this "ruling" is. If a prisoner suffers psychological problems from low self esteem because of his/her looks they were born with, does the state violate their 8th amendment rights by denying them plastic surgery?

In either case, sex change or facial surgery, even if one makes the case it would improve the prisoner's condition, how does the state violate their 8th amendment rights by NOT providing the surgery?

Am I missing something here, or is Chief Judge Mark L. Wolf totally senile or insane at this point?

Chico23231 09-24-2012 12:16 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
[url=http://news.yahoo.com/morning-pills-available-13-nyc-schools-101419990.html]Morning-after pills available at 13 NYC schools - Yahoo! News[/url]

what!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

RedskinRat 09-24-2012 12:32 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
After another Redskins win this isn't the thread to lift my spirits.

:(

If only we had a thread where we could post amusing pictures......

Chico23231 05-10-2013 04:08 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
[url=http://www.cnn.com/video/?hpt=hp_t1#/video/us/2013/04/01/tsr-marsh-million-dollar-bus-stop.cnn]CNN Video - Breaking News Videos from CNN.com[/url]

There you go Northern Virginia, this is why people say we need to cut the government and the spending.

First, the transportation director of Arlington county should be taken, beaten in the street and hung. Second, the person oking half the money in the federal grant should face the same fate. This is effing crazy, this is why tax payers are fed up.

mlmdub130 05-11-2013 10:41 AM

[QUOTE=Chico23231;1008693][url=http://www.cnn.com/video/?hpt=hp_t1#/video/us/2013/04/01/tsr-marsh-million-dollar-bus-stop.cnn]CNN Video - Breaking News Videos from CNN.com[/url]

There you go Northern Virginia, this is why people say we need to cut the government and the spending.

First, the transportation director of Arlington county should be taken, beaten in the street and hung. Second, the person oking half the money in the federal grant should face the same fate. This is effing crazy, this is why tax payers are fed up.[/QUOTE]

Unreal. That area is such a dump too. Oh I'm sorry I mean up and coming =\.

You know what else is great about that area? The additional crosswalks with lights for pedestrians they had to put in, because some people find it too hard to cross at an intersection. Wonder what those cost to toss in. Smh.

That Guy 05-11-2013 10:57 AM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
in china they actually punish this kind of thing with jail time.

mlmpetert 05-22-2013 02:24 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
On football!!!! And other sports!

[URL="http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nfl-shutdown-corner/congress-may-review-nfl-tax-exempt-status-004521453.html"]The U.S. Senate may — and should — review the NFL’s tax-exempt status[/URL]


While member teams obviously operate for profit, the interesting wrinkle here is that the league itself claims not to. And one way to avoid profitability is to pay your current and former executives up the wazoo, which the NFL has done. In 2012 alone, the league paid approximately $53.8 million to its big -ticket execs, including $11.6 million to Commissioner Roger Goodell and $8.5 million to former Commissioner Paul Tagliabue, who replaced Rozelle in 1989 and ran the league until Goodell replaced him in 2006. In 2011, Goodell received a $22.3 million bonus after negotiating several enormously lucrative extensions with the television networks that provide the predominant percentage of the league's revenues.

The league collects $6 million in annual membership dues from each team, the teams write off those dues as "charitable donations," and the NFL in turn takes that $192 million and puts it into a stadium fund that gives owners interest-free loans as long as they secure public financing for their new or renovated stadiums. That means we’re left with two bills: Not only do taxpayers lose out on federal tax revenue, we pay for new stadiums that generate profits which enrich only the owners.

As Andrew Delaney pointed out in the [URL="http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1605281"][COLOR=#0066cc]Vermont Law Review[/COLOR][/URL] in 2010, those stadium funds don't do much to benefit the cities that house the structures.

Technically, the city owns the stadium. Personal seat licenses or PSLs are sold through a public agency, tax-free. Profits are then used to pay down the owner’s share of the NFL loan. The money from the PSLs never goes directly to the teams, though the teams save millions of dollars in taxes and the loan from the NFL is paid down significantly, providing a very significant benefit to the owners.

Now, it would appear that the government is reviewing how this all came about. On April 24, Oklahoma Senator Tom Coburn (R.) [URL="http://thinkprogress.org/alyssa/2013/04/25/1923231/coburn-nfl-tax-exempt/?mobile=nc"][COLOR=#0066cc]introduced an amendment[/COLOR][/URL] to the Marketplace Fairness Act that would end the practice that allows professional sports leagues to qualify for tax-exempt status.
In his 2012 "Waste Book" tome, which chronicles government waste, Coburn outlined his theory.

The National Football League (NFL), the National Hockey League (NHL), and the Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) classify themselves as non-profit organizations to exempt themselves from federal income taxes on earnings. Smaller sports leagues, such as the National Lacrosse League, are also using the tax status. Taxpayers may be losing at least $91 million subsidizing these tax loopholes for professional sports leagues that generate billions of dollars annually in profits. Taxpayers should not be asked to subsidize sports organizations already benefiting widely from willing fans and turning a profit, while claiming to be non-profit organizations.

Teams in the NFL especially would have a hard time meeting the standards of organizations that, per the Revenue Code, have a setup in which “[n]o part of a business league’s net earnings may inure to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual and it may not be organized for profit to engage in an activity ordinarily carried on for profit.”

firstdown 05-22-2013 03:18 PM

Re: How do you like your tax money spent?
 
[quote=mlmpetert;1009771]On football!!!! And other sports!

[URL="http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nfl-shutdown-corner/congress-may-review-nfl-tax-exempt-status-004521453.html"]The U.S. Senate may — and should — review the NFL’s tax-exempt status[/URL]


While member teams obviously operate for profit, the interesting wrinkle here is that the league itself claims not to. And one way to avoid profitability is to pay your current and former executives up the wazoo, which the NFL has done. In 2012 alone, the league paid approximately $53.8 million to its big -ticket execs, including $11.6 million to Commissioner Roger Goodell and $8.5 million to former Commissioner Paul Tagliabue, who replaced Rozelle in 1989 and ran the league until Goodell replaced him in 2006. In 2011, Goodell received a $22.3 million bonus after negotiating several enormously lucrative extensions with the television networks that provide the predominant percentage of the league's revenues.

The league collects $6 million in annual membership dues from each team, the teams write off those dues as "charitable donations," and the NFL in turn takes that $192 million and puts it into a stadium fund that gives owners interest-free loans as long as they secure public financing for their new or renovated stadiums. That means we’re left with two bills: Not only do taxpayers lose out on federal tax revenue, we pay for new stadiums that generate profits which enrich only the owners.

As Andrew Delaney pointed out in the [URL="http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1605281"][COLOR=#0066cc]Vermont Law Review[/COLOR][/URL] in 2010, those stadium funds don't do much to benefit the cities that house the structures.

Technically, the city owns the stadium. Personal seat licenses or PSLs are sold through a public agency, tax-free. Profits are then used to pay down the owner’s share of the NFL loan. The money from the PSLs never goes directly to the teams, though the teams save millions of dollars in taxes and the loan from the NFL is paid down significantly, providing a very significant benefit to the owners.

Now, it would appear that the government is reviewing how this all came about. On April 24, Oklahoma Senator Tom Coburn (R.) [URL="http://thinkprogress.org/alyssa/2013/04/25/1923231/coburn-nfl-tax-exempt/?mobile=nc"][COLOR=#0066cc]introduced an amendment[/COLOR][/URL] to the Marketplace Fairness Act that would end the practice that allows professional sports leagues to qualify for tax-exempt status.
In his 2012 "Waste Book" tome, which chronicles government waste, Coburn outlined his theory.

The National Football League (NFL), the National Hockey League (NHL), and the Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) classify themselves as non-profit organizations to exempt themselves from federal income taxes on earnings. Smaller sports leagues, such as the National Lacrosse League, are also using the tax status. Taxpayers may be losing at least $91 million subsidizing these tax loopholes for professional sports leagues that generate billions of dollars annually in profits. Taxpayers should not be asked to subsidize sports organizations already benefiting widely from willing fans and turning a profit, while claiming to be non-profit organizations.

Teams in the NFL especially would have a hard time meeting the standards of organizations that, per the Revenue Code, have a setup in which “[n]o part of a business league’s net earnings may inure to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual and it may not be organized for profit to engage in an activity ordinarily carried on for profit.”[/quote]

The thing is all those profits have to be paid out and whats paid out is taxed at probably around 33%. Not sure why they are listed as tax exempt but its not like they are not paying any taxes.


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