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Run defense?

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Old 07-28-2004, 12:10 AM   #1
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Run defense?

Does anybody know if were gonna be running a one-gap or two-gap defense this year. I know for sure that Williams with the titans and bills ran a one-gap defense. I know also that Blache ran a one-gap defense in Chicago. But from the sound of things it seems that were gonna be running a two-gap defense because of all the talk of noble playing nose tackle. Which of course is a position in the two gap defense. I personally think our personall is a better fit for the two-gap defense. But recent teams that are best against the run have all been running the one-gap defense. What are your guy's thoughts?
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Old 07-28-2004, 12:27 AM   #2
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hmm. Is one game and two gap the equivilant of saying 3-4 and 4-3 defense. Could someone explain the terminolgy a bit for me, thanks.
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Old 07-28-2004, 12:42 AM   #3
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A two-gay defense is where you have a nose tackle in from of a center and two ends inbetween the guard and tackle. All teams that run a 3-4 have a two gap run defense.
One-gap is where you have two tackles inbetween the guard and center and two ends. In a 4-3 you can play either one or two gap.
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Old 07-28-2004, 12:45 AM   #4
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gap my bad *
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Old 07-28-2004, 01:20 AM   #5
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how would you play two gap when running 4-3?
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Old 07-28-2004, 02:14 AM   #6
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Professor Crisp Explains the Gap

I think Joe Crisp did a really good job of explaining the gap defense a few weeks back in another thread, one of the best I've ever read actually. So I'm just going to repost what he wrote:

"When coaches explain to their D-linemen where exactly they want them to line up on a given play, they use a numbering system based on the O-linemen and the gaps between the O-linemen.

Using the Center position on the offensive line as the starting point, the Center is "0", the gap between the center and offensive guard is "1," the offensive guard himself is "2," the gap between the offensive guard and offensive tackle is "3," the offensive tackle himself is "4," the gap between the offensive tackle and tight end is "5," and the TE himself is "6". The TE's inside shoulder (or "shade-in") is "7," the gap fully outside the TE is "8," and the TE's outside shoulder (or "shade-out") is "9." It looks something like this:

.....TE...OT...OG...C...OG...OT...TE

8.....6....4......2....0....2.....4......6.....8

....9..7.5....3....1.....1.....3....5.7....9

So when I describe Jermaine Haley as a more ideal "0" or "1" gap player, I mean he is best suited for playing heads-up on the Center, or in the gap between the center and guard (this gap is also referred to as the "A" gap). This is because you generally want a heftier, "roadblock" type of DT in there as an anchor who can occupy two blockers (generally the center and a guard) without getting run-over. A successful "0" or "1" technician will divert blockers from the linebackers and other D-linemen, and make it easier for the linebackers to diagnose and attack the play.

Cornelius Griffin and Joe Salave'a, on the other hand, seem better suited for playing "2" or "3" techniques, where they will try to shoot the gaps between the OG and OT. Often, they attack the vacancy left when a guard double teams the "1" technician with the center, or when an OG double teams a DE with an OT. They are generally quicker and more agile than "1" technicians, but rely on the anchoring effect of the bigger DT to burst through the gaps and into the backfield."

Thanks again to Joe Crisp for that clear, concise explanation of gap defenses.
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Old 07-28-2004, 08:43 AM   #7
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thanks joe for the info, and smoot for making it available.
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Old 07-28-2004, 11:26 AM   #8
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that was something i was wondering about, thanks.
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Old 07-28-2004, 12:11 PM   #9
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Question I mis-heard!

I must have mis-heard! I'm sure I understood Mike Golic say the 2 gap was when he had to be responsible for two holes the RB could scoot through. The 1 gap was when he had one hole to cover.
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Old 07-28-2004, 12:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backrow
I must have mis-heard! I'm sure I understood Mike Golic say the 2 gap was when he had to be responsible for two holes the RB could scoot through. The 1 gap was when he had one hole to cover.

Backrow, you correct.
Joe Crisp's great explaination is of gaps and placement of the DT's in those gaps. But my understanding from way wayway back from my playing days as a defensive end is exactly like yours.
My coaches taught me, in a two gap defense the defensive lineman are responsible for two gaps in the offensive line. In a one gap the D-lineman are only responsible for one gap.
It is easier to play the one gap cause you can charge your gap and not have to worry about another gap. It is easier to get sacks this way.
But the drawback to the one gap is you have only 3 to 4 D-lineman to cover six gaps. So have to depend on LB's and safety's to cover the remaining gaps if it happens to be a running play. This could distracts the LB's and Safety's from their coverage duties on pass plays if they are faked out on a play action play.
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Old 07-28-2004, 04:42 PM   #11
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"Noble said he is slated to be the starting nose tackle alongside newly signed Cornelius Griffin. Joe Salave'a is working behind Noble, and Jermaine Haley trails Griffin at the "three-technique" spot, where the defender lines up on the outside edge of the guard and is expected to get more backfield penetration."

Noble's job is primarily to tie up two blockers, something he excelled at in Dallas. I'm guessing it's more of a one gap system, which makes sense considering all the talk I've heard about Williams freeing up the lineman to get penetration and make plays. I think it's a one back system because it's a more attacking style of defense that Williams is bringing, while two gap systems seem to be more about containment. I think Marvin Lewis ran a two gap system here, which would then explain why he constantly harped on Arrington to be more disciplined.
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Old 07-28-2004, 07:06 PM   #12
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Sorry guys, I guess it can be a bit confusing. My post indeed referred to the "techniques" defensive linemen play in terms of "gaps". While you can use the term "gap" to refer to the "1" and "3" holes (or "A" and "B" gaps!) that DLs can attack, it's more appropriate to refer to these as "techiques" when describing the positioning of the DLs in relation to the offensive linemen. The intent of that post was to describe the differences between the positioning of different kinds of defensive tackles, so I should have stuck to "techniques" to avoid confusion between the desciption of positioning and the "gap" descriptions given to different kinds of defensive philosophies.

Backrow, Defensewins and Memphisskins are all absolutely right in their takes on the terms "1-gap" and "2-gap".

The term "1-gap", when referring to defensive strategies or philosophies, describes an aggressive, attacking style of defense wherein the defensive linemen and linebackers (and occasionally safeties) are instructed to attack and penetrate a particular hole, or "gap", between the offensive linemen. Each player is responsible for a different gap, and the "techniques" that I described in my previous post would be used to explain to each player how he should line up in order to attack his assigned gap.

The same "technique" assignments would be used in a 2-gap defense, but in this case, the philosophy or strategy is more about containment, or "read-and-react". The defensive linemen and/or linebackers are assigned responsibility for the two gaps on either side of their opposing blocker, and they must "read-and-fill", depending on where the ball goes. For instance, a defensive tackle playing a two-gap, "0"-technique would be responsible for the "1" hole (or "A" gap!) on either side of the center. A tackle playing a two-gap, "2" technique would be responsible for the "1" and "3" holes (or "A" and "B" gaps!) on either side of the guard in front of him.

Different coaches use varying degrees of 1-gap and 2-gap approaches, and therefore are labeled as such. I would agree with memphisskin in his assessment that Williams will probably use more of a 1-gap approach, in that he intends to bring a very aggressive and attacking philosophy of defense, utilizing a lot of blitzes. However, coaches will use both approaches throughout the course of a game, in order to respond to different things that the offense is doing, and to exploit particular matchups. Williams' defensive philosophy-- much like Gibbs' offensive philosophy-- is very versatile, and he will adapt his gameplan depending on the opponent and the situation.

Last edited by joecrisp; 07-28-2004 at 09:49 PM.
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