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Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

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Old 04-21-2008, 09:21 AM   #106
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Re: Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

I wanted to provide one more point that I believe all the "for" CJ people are trying to make.

These teams should have passed on these WRsby ED THOMPSON, Scout.com
Updated: April 21, 2008, 7:15 AM EST 61 comments add this RSS blog email print You often hear the stories from NFL GMs and coaches about the player they really wanted to select but weren't able to pick during the NFL Draft because another team snatched them away just a pick or two earlier. But you don't hear them talk much about their one-pick misfires involving a player at the same position who was picked right after they made their choice — and who turned out to be a colossal oversight.

Ten teams have made the most noteworthy one-pick misfires over the past decade involving wide receivers. Take a look at the receivers they chose — and the receivers they allowed to slip just one pick away in that year's draft.


Read more at...

Get more on the draft at Scout.com
Steuber's NFL Draft mailbag
No, 1 pick: Boom or bust
NFL Draft Q&A: Colt Brennan
2008 Mock Draft, Round 1 | Round 2
Scout.com Draft rankings
Head 2 Head: Long vs. Gholston
Head 2 Head: Kelly vs. Thomas
Full NFL Draft, free-agency coverage
7-day FREE trial at Scout.com

Miami: Remember Larry Shannon? Well, you have a better memory than mine if you did. He was the Dolphins' third-round pick out of East Carolina back in 1998. And although he made two game appearances, he never caught a pass in a regular season game. By contrast, the next receiver selected in that draft just ten picks later was a Hines Ward out of the University of Georgia, who has caught 719 passes for 8,737 yards and 65 touchdowns during his pro career. You've most likely heard of him.

New England: With the 13th pick in the second round of the 2003 draft, the Patriots chose Texas A&M wide receiver Bethel Johnson, who provided more spark as a kickoff return specialist than he ever did as a receiver during his three seasons in New England. After making just 30 catches for the Patriots, he spent a year as a reserve receiver for Minnesota and was cut at the end of training camp by the Texans last year. If the Patriots would have chosen the next receiver selected in that draft instead, it's likely that they wouldn't have bothered to acquire Randy Moss last year. Quarterback Tom Brady would have already had his deep-threat receiver on board — Anquan Boldin — who was picked nine slots after Bethel Johnson when the Cardinals made their second-round pick. Boldin has 413 career catches for 5,438 yards and 29 touchdowns after five NFL seasons in Arizona.

Philadelphia: In 1991 the Eagles used the 25th overall pick on UCLA wide receiver Freddie Mitchell, who finished his four-year career in Philadelphia with 90 catches for 1,263 yards and five scores. The receiver who was picked next at number 30 in that round, Reggie Wayne, has posted four consecutive 1,000-yard seasons in Indianapolis, including a 104-catch season last year for 1,510 yards and 10 touchdowns. He's caught 47 touchdown passes in his seven seasons with the Colts.



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Detroit: The Lions have used four first-round picks on receivers over the past 10 years, and two of those players are no longer with the team — Mike Williams and Charles Rogers. While they've had better luck with their other two first-rounders, Roy Williams and Calvin Johnson, Rogers' failure was particularly costly. The second overall pick in the 2003 draft, Rogers caught just 36 passes for 440 yards and four touchdowns during his three years in Detroit. The next receiver taken in that draft, with the very next selection, was Andre Johnson, who was picked by the Houston Texans. Can you imagine the sleepless nights that Roy Williams, Andre Johnson and Calvin Johnson would be causing defensive coordinators if Detroit hadn't made that mistake? Or would the Lions have even picked Calvin Johnson if they already had a Williams-Johnson tandem in place?

Cleveland: The Browns also had a pair of noteworthy one-pick misses. The first one involved Quincy Morgan, who spent his first four years in Cleveland after being chosen with the second pick of Round 2 in the 2001 draft. A steady, yet unspectacular performer, he caught 133 passes for the Browns for 2,056 yards and 15 touchdowns before bouncing around the league as a free agent. Despite some solid performances by Morgan, what made the pick so awful for Cleveland was that it turned out to be a double-whammy of sorts. A division rival was the next team to select a wide receiver with the fifth pick in that round. The Cincinnati Bengals chose Oregon State's Chad Johnson, who would become a major nuisance to the Browns' secondary for years to come. He's caught 559 passes for 8,365 yards and 49 touchdowns during his first seven years in Cincinnati.

The other one-pick mishap by the Browns occurred during the 2000 NFL Draft when they selected JaJuan Dawson with the 17th pick in the third round. They cut him loose after two seasons with just 31 catches under his belt. The receiver that the Seattle Seahawks picked with the next selection in that round, Darrell Jackson, turned in three 1,000-yard seasons during his seven seasons in Seattle while scoring 47 touchdowns and amassing over 6,400 receiving yards before signing with the 49ers in 2007.

Baltimore: Oregon's Demetrius Williams was picked by the Ravens in the fourth round of the 2006 draft. The 14th selection in that round, Williams is still with the team and has been making nice progress, catching 42 balls in his first two seasons for 686 yards and two touchdowns. But the Ravens, who haven't had much luck with the 10 receivers they've selected since the 2000 NFL draft other than Mark Clayton and Travis Taylor, could have had the next wide receiver selected — Brandon Marshall — who was picked by Denver with the 22nd selection in that round. Marshall caught 102 passes for 1,325 yards and scored seven touchdowns last year. None of the Ravens' twelve drafted wide receivers over the past ten years have posted a 1,000-yard season in Baltimore.

Jacksonville: The Jaguars made the University of Washington's Reggie Williams the ninth overall pick in the 2004 draft. And while he hasn't been a washout by any means, he can't match the production of the player that Buffalo took when they selected the next wide receiver just four picks later. While Williams has made 152 catches for 1,958 yards and scored 15 touchdowns, those numbers pale by comparison to the Bills' Lee Evans who has 233 catches for 3,727 yards and 29 touchdowns during the same four-year span.

Prior to that one-pick misjudgment, the Jaguars had selected USC wide receiver R. Jay Soward with the 29th overall pick in the 2000 draft. He played for one stormy season and caught 14 passes during 13 game appearances and two starts. After being suspended several times by the NFL for violating the league's substance abuse policy, he ended up playing a few seasons in the Canadian Football League for the Toronto Argonauts. Ironically, the receiver who was selected next with the first pick in Round 2 was Dennis Northcutt, who signed with the Jaguars in 2007 as a free agent after providing the Browns with seven solid years of work as a receiver and punt return specialist.

Kansas City: The Chiefs had to be fairly satisfied with the value they got from their fourth-round pick in 2004 when they added Oregon's Samie Parker to their roster with the ninth selection in the round. Parker made a noticeable contribution in three of his first four seasons with a total of 110 catches for 1,529 yards and seven touchdown catches. But Kansas City misfired by overlooking the next receiver that was snatched up by the New York Jets just three picks later — North Carolina State's Jerricho Cotchery — who has caught 82 passes in each of the last two seasons and accumulated 2,402 receiving yards and eight touchdowns during his first four years in the league.

New York Giants: The Jets were also the beneficiary of a misguided pick by their NFC neighbors in the 2000 NFL Draft. With the 11th pick in the third round, the Giants sent the name of Ron Dixon to the podium. He ended up catching 36 passes for them over a three-year period. The Jets then used the 16th pick in that same round to grab a Florida State wide receiver that the Giants bypassed — Laveranues Coles, who is in his second-stint with the Jets and is heading into his eighth NFL season. He's caught 561 passes for 7,245 yards and 37 touchdowns during his career.

Tennessee: In 1998 they were known as the Tennessee Oilers, not the Titans. And they were the first team to grab a wide receiver when they made their selection with the 16th overall pick. The relocated team opted for Utah's Kevin Dyson, who spent five years with the organization and caught 176 passes for 2,310 yards and 18 touchdowns before leaving for Carolina as a free agent. But one wide receiver pick later, the Minnesota Vikings chose Marshall's Randy Moss, who has rolled up over 12,000 receiving yards and has scored 124 times during his NFL career.

For more draft coverage, visit ScoutNFLexperts.com.



This is exactly why some of us are saying lets trade for CJ. He's proven and there's no way of knowing how some newbe is going to turn out in the draft. By picking a WR in the first round we are taking a crap shoot and probably waisting a pick. If we trade we may be trading alot in your standards but not others and we will already know what we are getting. We will not be taking a chance on a possible dud.
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Old 04-21-2008, 09:35 AM   #107
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Re: Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

Quote:
Originally Posted by SBXVII View Post
I wanted to provide one more point that I believe all the "for" CJ people are trying to make.

These teams should have passed on these WRsby ED THOMPSON, Scout.com
Updated: April 21, 2008, 7:15 AM EST 61 comments add this RSS blog email print You often hear the stories from NFL GMs and coaches about the player they really wanted to select but weren't able to pick during the NFL Draft because another team snatched them away just a pick or two earlier. But you don't hear them talk much about their one-pick misfires involving a player at the same position who was picked right after they made their choice — and who turned out to be a colossal oversight.

Ten teams have made the most noteworthy one-pick misfires over the past decade involving wide receivers. Take a look at the receivers they chose — and the receivers they allowed to slip just one pick away in that year's draft.


Read more at...

Get more on the draft at Scout.com
Steuber's NFL Draft mailbag
No, 1 pick: Boom or bust
NFL Draft Q&A: Colt Brennan
2008 Mock Draft, Round 1 | Round 2
Scout.com Draft rankings
Head 2 Head: Long vs. Gholston
Head 2 Head: Kelly vs. Thomas
Full NFL Draft, free-agency coverage
7-day FREE trial at Scout.com

Miami: Remember Larry Shannon? Well, you have a better memory than mine if you did. He was the Dolphins' third-round pick out of East Carolina back in 1998. And although he made two game appearances, he never caught a pass in a regular season game. By contrast, the next receiver selected in that draft just ten picks later was a Hines Ward out of the University of Georgia, who has caught 719 passes for 8,737 yards and 65 touchdowns during his pro career. You've most likely heard of him.

New England: With the 13th pick in the second round of the 2003 draft, the Patriots chose Texas A&M wide receiver Bethel Johnson, who provided more spark as a kickoff return specialist than he ever did as a receiver during his three seasons in New England. After making just 30 catches for the Patriots, he spent a year as a reserve receiver for Minnesota and was cut at the end of training camp by the Texans last year. If the Patriots would have chosen the next receiver selected in that draft instead, it's likely that they wouldn't have bothered to acquire Randy Moss last year. Quarterback Tom Brady would have already had his deep-threat receiver on board — Anquan Boldin — who was picked nine slots after Bethel Johnson when the Cardinals made their second-round pick. Boldin has 413 career catches for 5,438 yards and 29 touchdowns after five NFL seasons in Arizona.

Philadelphia: In 1991 the Eagles used the 25th overall pick on UCLA wide receiver Freddie Mitchell, who finished his four-year career in Philadelphia with 90 catches for 1,263 yards and five scores. The receiver who was picked next at number 30 in that round, Reggie Wayne, has posted four consecutive 1,000-yard seasons in Indianapolis, including a 104-catch season last year for 1,510 yards and 10 touchdowns. He's caught 47 touchdown passes in his seven seasons with the Colts.



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Detroit: The Lions have used four first-round picks on receivers over the past 10 years, and two of those players are no longer with the team — Mike Williams and Charles Rogers. While they've had better luck with their other two first-rounders, Roy Williams and Calvin Johnson, Rogers' failure was particularly costly. The second overall pick in the 2003 draft, Rogers caught just 36 passes for 440 yards and four touchdowns during his three years in Detroit. The next receiver taken in that draft, with the very next selection, was Andre Johnson, who was picked by the Houston Texans. Can you imagine the sleepless nights that Roy Williams, Andre Johnson and Calvin Johnson would be causing defensive coordinators if Detroit hadn't made that mistake? Or would the Lions have even picked Calvin Johnson if they already had a Williams-Johnson tandem in place?

Cleveland: The Browns also had a pair of noteworthy one-pick misses. The first one involved Quincy Morgan, who spent his first four years in Cleveland after being chosen with the second pick of Round 2 in the 2001 draft. A steady, yet unspectacular performer, he caught 133 passes for the Browns for 2,056 yards and 15 touchdowns before bouncing around the league as a free agent. Despite some solid performances by Morgan, what made the pick so awful for Cleveland was that it turned out to be a double-whammy of sorts. A division rival was the next team to select a wide receiver with the fifth pick in that round. The Cincinnati Bengals chose Oregon State's Chad Johnson, who would become a major nuisance to the Browns' secondary for years to come. He's caught 559 passes for 8,365 yards and 49 touchdowns during his first seven years in Cincinnati.

The other one-pick mishap by the Browns occurred during the 2000 NFL Draft when they selected JaJuan Dawson with the 17th pick in the third round. They cut him loose after two seasons with just 31 catches under his belt. The receiver that the Seattle Seahawks picked with the next selection in that round, Darrell Jackson, turned in three 1,000-yard seasons during his seven seasons in Seattle while scoring 47 touchdowns and amassing over 6,400 receiving yards before signing with the 49ers in 2007.

Baltimore: Oregon's Demetrius Williams was picked by the Ravens in the fourth round of the 2006 draft. The 14th selection in that round, Williams is still with the team and has been making nice progress, catching 42 balls in his first two seasons for 686 yards and two touchdowns. But the Ravens, who haven't had much luck with the 10 receivers they've selected since the 2000 NFL draft other than Mark Clayton and Travis Taylor, could have had the next wide receiver selected — Brandon Marshall — who was picked by Denver with the 22nd selection in that round. Marshall caught 102 passes for 1,325 yards and scored seven touchdowns last year. None of the Ravens' twelve drafted wide receivers over the past ten years have posted a 1,000-yard season in Baltimore.

Jacksonville: The Jaguars made the University of Washington's Reggie Williams the ninth overall pick in the 2004 draft. And while he hasn't been a washout by any means, he can't match the production of the player that Buffalo took when they selected the next wide receiver just four picks later. While Williams has made 152 catches for 1,958 yards and scored 15 touchdowns, those numbers pale by comparison to the Bills' Lee Evans who has 233 catches for 3,727 yards and 29 touchdowns during the same four-year span.

Prior to that one-pick misjudgment, the Jaguars had selected USC wide receiver R. Jay Soward with the 29th overall pick in the 2000 draft. He played for one stormy season and caught 14 passes during 13 game appearances and two starts. After being suspended several times by the NFL for violating the league's substance abuse policy, he ended up playing a few seasons in the Canadian Football League for the Toronto Argonauts. Ironically, the receiver who was selected next with the first pick in Round 2 was Dennis Northcutt, who signed with the Jaguars in 2007 as a free agent after providing the Browns with seven solid years of work as a receiver and punt return specialist.

Kansas City: The Chiefs had to be fairly satisfied with the value they got from their fourth-round pick in 2004 when they added Oregon's Samie Parker to their roster with the ninth selection in the round. Parker made a noticeable contribution in three of his first four seasons with a total of 110 catches for 1,529 yards and seven touchdown catches. But Kansas City misfired by overlooking the next receiver that was snatched up by the New York Jets just three picks later — North Carolina State's Jerricho Cotchery — who has caught 82 passes in each of the last two seasons and accumulated 2,402 receiving yards and eight touchdowns during his first four years in the league.

New York Giants: The Jets were also the beneficiary of a misguided pick by their NFC neighbors in the 2000 NFL Draft. With the 11th pick in the third round, the Giants sent the name of Ron Dixon to the podium. He ended up catching 36 passes for them over a three-year period. The Jets then used the 16th pick in that same round to grab a Florida State wide receiver that the Giants bypassed — Laveranues Coles, who is in his second-stint with the Jets and is heading into his eighth NFL season. He's caught 561 passes for 7,245 yards and 37 touchdowns during his career.

Tennessee: In 1998 they were known as the Tennessee Oilers, not the Titans. And they were the first team to grab a wide receiver when they made their selection with the 16th overall pick. The relocated team opted for Utah's Kevin Dyson, who spent five years with the organization and caught 176 passes for 2,310 yards and 18 touchdowns before leaving for Carolina as a free agent. But one wide receiver pick later, the Minnesota Vikings chose Marshall's Randy Moss, who has rolled up over 12,000 receiving yards and has scored 124 times during his NFL career.

For more draft coverage, visit ScoutNFLexperts.com.



This is exactly why some of us are saying lets trade for CJ. He's proven and there's no way of knowing how some newbe is going to turn out in the draft. By picking a WR in the first round we are taking a crap shoot and probably waisting a pick. If we trade we may be trading alot in your standards but not others and we will already know what we are getting. We will not be taking a chance on a possible dud.

The building through the draft vs free agency is always going to be an argument. I think trading for guys like Chad Johnson, Randy Moss, Deanglo Hall, Jared Allen...guys of this caliber is a smart move if you have the money. You know what you are getting. Money clearly is a conern, as is age. A lot of times trades involve older players.

Im a big proponent of drafting 'best availble' and not need. Take this year, when the skins pick odds are there will have been a lot of corners and ends taken. The odds that there are five stud ends or five stud corenrs in the first round is so small. Id rather take my chances with the top safety, or the second best guard, or mabye even the first or second best receiver.

Theres going to be a tremendous amount of talent available we just need a great scouting department to find it. I think when you pick for need you start reaching for guys and usually make a bad pick.
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Old 04-21-2008, 11:47 AM   #108
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Re: Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

I said it once and will say it again. I believe that some players are not going to make it at the NFL level but find it hard to believe so many don't. I have to think some of it is the player and the scheme being run and other times it maybe the coach's ability to develope the player into something special. ie: I'm not a fan of our WR coach.....is it Stan Hixon? I know he was reported to be one of the best in college but so was Spurrier. I have not seen us developing WR talent and wonder where the break down is. Yes we can go out and draft a top 10 WR in the draft but does our team have the ability to develope the player for our needs? I have a tendancy to think no. Which is why I keep saying we need to trade for a talented, experienced WR. Plus he has 4-5 yrs left in him. Lets say we draft a WR, most contracts are 4-6 yrs with the last 1-2 bing able to be opted out of. Which in essence is a 4-5 yr contract anyway. This would allow us some time to pick up a young replacement WR in the draft to learn and be an understudy of the vetran. If you look at all the great WR you will see that they had someone in front of them to show them the ropes prior to them stepping up and making a name for themselves. They will even achnoledge that fact. Who do we have? An ailing #1 (Moss) who has had more Hammies then almost anyone at a deli, and a #2 (Randel El) who is good but not great. I almost forgot Thrash. Everyone else is a no name I believe. We either need a top notch WR coach to develope players or a WR that brings something to the table as far as talent goes.
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Old 04-21-2008, 01:15 PM   #109
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Re: Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

I don't know if we can blame stan hixon. Was it his fault that Taylor Jacobs didn't ever produce? We shipped him to San Fran & it was the same story there.

I agree w/all that are pointing out how difficult it is to draft a wr & have them produce for you. It's a high bust position for sure, but that's all the more reason to draft them in rounds 2-4 and stay away from round 1 unless you have that odd talent like Calvin Johnson last year.

also, some wr's go to other teams and are successful in a different system, as mentioned by SBXVII. That indicates that drafting a wr is as much about fitting them in the scheme as it is their talent, work ethic, etc.
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Old 04-21-2008, 01:40 PM   #110
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Re: Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

True enough :>
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Old 04-21-2008, 05:01 PM   #111
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Re: Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

Im going to make note that theres another thread about Roy Williams being traded. Until someone changes this thread title its about vets, and Roy Williams fits that bill. Even though all the talk has been about CJ.

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theres the link.
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Old 04-21-2008, 05:45 PM   #112
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Re: Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

I didn't want to start a new thread so...

Argos sign receiver David Boston
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Old 04-21-2008, 05:49 PM   #113
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Re: Redskins draft day trade for veteran WR

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I didn't want to start a new thread so...

Argos sign receiver David Boston
Damn, I was hoping we could sign him to a vet minimum, and he could bring some depth to WR, I hope that he plays well there and can rejuvenate his NFL career.
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