Warpath  

Home | Forums | Salary Cap Info | Shop | Donate | Stay Connected




Go Back   Warpath > Redskins Forums > Redskins Locker Room


Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Redskins Locker Room


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-24-2008, 02:45 PM   #16
Puppy Kicker
 
Daseal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Arlington, Virginia
Age: 31
Posts: 8,218
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

He was just on NFL radio. Guess what his assignment is this year. He's going to be a West Point football coach. Glad we're keeping this young man out of the NFL to coach football.
__________________
Best. Player. Available.
Daseal is offline   Reply With Quote

Advertisements
Old 07-24-2008, 04:50 PM   #17
Special Teams
 
riggins44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Yorktown, VA
Posts: 148
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

I didn't know until today that the other service academy's don't have the same policy. From what I understand this ruling was by the DOD and not West Point.

Like the idea of having them pay back the money for their education. That would be a win/win situation.
riggins44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2008, 04:57 PM   #18
Playmaker
 
SouperMeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Leesburg, VA
Age: 50
Posts: 3,075
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

The Army downright used Campbell and the NFL for free publicity during the draft. If it was their intention to call him to active duty, they should have made that clear long before the draft.
SouperMeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2008, 05:05 PM   #19
Special Teams
 
Ade Jimoh Fan Club's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 410
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SouperMeister View Post
The Army downright used Campbell and the NFL for free publicity during the draft. If it was their intention to call him to active duty, they should have made that clear long before the draft.
Talk about a PR backfire. What transpired is that it was a great PR story for Army/West Point and then the vocal minority of idiots complained how it wasn't fair (b/c they didn't understand the bigger picture) and the Army caved. Now it is a stinky mess...
Ade Jimoh Fan Club is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2008, 05:17 PM   #20
Special Teams
 
Ade Jimoh Fan Club's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 410
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

WOW- this article sums it up PERFECTLY:

Caleb Campbell: The Army's Loss Is The Detroit Lions' Legal Gain?


"The Army blew it. They implemented a policy that was designed to draw attention to the unique skills and talents of their servicemen and, in the process, make it easier to recruit soldiers to the Army by attracting positive publicity and media attention. The policy was enacted in 2005 because filling the ranks of a volunteer army was increasingly difficult. Caleb Campbell’s being selected by the Detroit Lions last April represented the fruition of that policy. Tens of millions of people were exposed to a guy who represented everything that was good about West Point and military service. Campbell’s engaging, humble, funny, smart, and a leader. I know from personal experience because I had the good fortune to train alongside him for the NFL Draft this past January-March. (Don't worry, I trained for comic relief.)

But you don’t have to believe me to understand what a success the Army policy had been. You only have to read the words of Army spokesperson Lt. Col. Anne Edgecomb in an AP article last month:

The real advantage for the Army is just the amount of publicity we get," Edgecomb said in an AP story published on June 13. "When you think about it, who's the best recruiter for the Navy you can think of? David Robinson. He's called the Admiral, for goodness sake. The attention that we get in our primary demographic to have someone playing sports who's in the Army, that's where (we) in the Army see the advantage in this program.

About face, indeed.

In March I traveled to West Point and spent two days following Campbell around from one class to another. I saw how hard he worked in class, at school, and as a soldier. Most importantly I saw that while Campbell was a very skilled football player it represented a small part of his personality and an even smaller portion of the four years he’d spent training to be a solider in our nation's military. I talked to his classmates at West Point and heard how eager they were to have one of their own representing the Academy in the NFL. Now, with one bad decision reached the day before his dream became a reality, the Army has stripped away that opportunity from Caleb Campbell.

Campbell is not going to fight the change in this policy because he’s a soldier and he believes his first duty is to his superiors. That’s admirable. What isn’t admirable is when a superior officer screws up and forces subordinates to pay the price for their mistakes. And let’s face it, the Army screwed up. Royally. They pulled the proverbial rug out from under an existing policy after several parties had relied on their policy. If Campbell was a civilian and he sued in a civil court based on this fact pattern, he’d win. There's a decent chance that if the right judge heard his case in a civilian court, the judge would issue a temporary restraining order to stop the Army from changing their policy after everyone relied upon it to their detriment.

As a soldier Cambpell could have an actionable claim because he relied upon an existing Army policy. As a sophomore many schools encouraged Campbell to transfer and play football for them. But the Army, and Coach Bobby Ross in particular, persuaded Campbell that he should stay because graduating from West Point would mean something, be a true accomplishment. Unlike other athletes from football factories who graduated without having to put any effort into earning their degree, Campbell, a soldier of character, would earn his degree and be proud of his accomplishment on his graduation day.

Point being, the Army dangled this policy as a carrot to persuade Campbell that he could have the best of both worlds, a great education and, potentially if he was good enough, a career as a professional football player. After his sophomore year, Campbell could have left West Point and gone anywhere in the country without owing the Army anything. But he didn’t. Caleb Campbell kept his promise to the Army—sadly the Army didn’t keep their promise to him. So in my mind, Campbell has an actionable claim, but he’s too good of a soldier to call the Army on their duplicity.

But what about the Lions? The Army informed the NFL that Campbell was eligible to play this fall in 2008. It’s why the Lions drafted him. Campbell himself knew there was skepticism from NFL teams about his eligibility and that’s why he had the Army notify teams of their existing policy. Now, interestingly, the Detroit Lions actually have a legal claim against the United States Army rooted in contract law. The Lions could sue the Army arguing that the Army is breaching their promise that Campbell was eligible to be drafted. After all, draft picks have a value and if they couldn’t draft Campbell to play football the Lions could have used their 7th round pick to take any other college player in the country. Not only has the Army pulled the rug out from underneath Campbell, but they’ve also screwed the Lions in the process.

Now, the Lions aren’t likely to sue the Army over Campbell because the NFL is patriotic. And patriotism in the NFL’s mind means blindly accepting anything that the Army does — be that claiming that Pat Tillman was the victim of terrorists or allowing one of their lawfully drafted players to be sent to war. To do otherwise would be bad publicity.

So now the Army has created a double storm for itself, they’re damned in both directions, fighting a two front war. They’ve managed to anger everyone without solving any actual problem. The reality is Campbell’s service as an individual soldier is much more valuable from a public relations perspective than it is from a soldiering one. You and I can clearly see that. But we aren’t Caleb Campbell’s superiors. Ultimately Caleb Campbell is a soldier. And, unfortunately for him, a soldier doesn’t get to choose which orders to follow."
Ade Jimoh Fan Club is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2008, 08:49 PM   #21
Playmaker
 
724Skinsfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 3,506
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

From the posted article above: "Campbell is not going to fight the change in this policy because he’s a soldier and he believes his first duty is to his superiors."

I'd say that about sums the whole thing up.
__________________
"I hope I'm getting better. I hope you haven't seen my best." - Jim Zorn
724Skinsfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 08:47 AM   #22
Playmaker
 
irish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 3,597
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 724Skinsfan View Post
From the posted article above: "Campbell is not going to fight the change in this policy because he’s a soldier and he believes his first duty is to his superiors."

I'd say that about sums the whole thing up.
The only way the military is able to function is by getting kids to buy into ideas that no sane adult would even consider.
irish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 08:51 AM   #23
Playmaker
 
cpayne5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 3,807
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by irish View Post
The only way the military is able to function is by getting kids to buy into ideas that no sane adult would even consider.
So, everyone in the military is either a kid, or an insane adult.

Good to have you back, irish!

__________________
"It's not about what you've done, but what's been done for you."
cpayne5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 09:13 AM   #24
Contains football related knowledge
 
JoeRedskin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Second Star On The Right
Age: 51
Posts: 8,533
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by irish View Post
The only way the military is able to function is by getting kids to buy into ideas that no sane adult would even consider.
That is beyond insulting to those that serve our country and protect your whiny ass at the risk of their own lives.

I cannot begin to express how angry this comment makes me.
__________________
You aren't worth the water in my spit but, maybe, just maybe, you're worth the lead in my shotgun.
JoeRedskin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 09:19 AM   #25
Living Legend
 
Monkeydad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: PA
Age: 35
Posts: 16,275
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by irish View Post
The only way the military is able to function is by getting kids to buy into ideas that no sane adult would even consider.
I'm ashamed to share an Irish heritage with an ignorant ass like you. (unless you're just some Notre Dame fan)

You are either grossly uninformed about the military or just immature.
__________________
Not sent from a Droid, iPhone, Blackberry or toaster
Monkeydad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 09:24 AM   #26
Playmaker
 
BleedBurgundy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 4,469
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Not sure if this has been said, but it's worth pointing out: He's not going to Iraq or Afghanistan, he's going back to West Point to coach football. I have a hard time getting too worked up over this when more "anonymous" servicmembers are being killed every day.
__________________
"All natural institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian, or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit."

Thomas Paine
BleedBurgundy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 09:59 AM   #27
Registered User
 
firstdown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: chesapeake, va
Age: 50
Posts: 15,818
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GhettoDogAllStars View Post
From what I understand, Congressmen get paid about $165,000 per year. So, I would say our Congressmen misuse that kind of money every year, and they always get a free ride.

But, I like AJFC's idea: make them pay back the cost.
Congressmen are elected and if the people keep electing people who waist our money then its the peoples fault!!
firstdown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 10:20 AM   #28
Registered User
 
firstdown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: chesapeake, va
Age: 50
Posts: 15,818
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ade Jimoh Fan Club View Post
WOW- this article sums it up PERFECTLY:

Caleb Campbell: The Army's Loss Is The Detroit Lions' Legal Gain?


"The Army blew it. They implemented a policy that was designed to draw attention to the unique skills and talents of their servicemen and, in the process, make it easier to recruit soldiers to the Army by attracting positive publicity and media attention. The policy was enacted in 2005 because filling the ranks of a volunteer army was increasingly difficult. Caleb Campbell’s being selected by the Detroit Lions last April represented the fruition of that policy. Tens of millions of people were exposed to a guy who represented everything that was good about West Point and military service. Campbell’s engaging, humble, funny, smart, and a leader. I know from personal experience because I had the good fortune to train alongside him for the NFL Draft this past January-March. (Don't worry, I trained for comic relief.)

But you don’t have to believe me to understand what a success the Army policy had been. You only have to read the words of Army spokesperson Lt. Col. Anne Edgecomb in an AP article last month:

The real advantage for the Army is just the amount of publicity we get," Edgecomb said in an AP story published on June 13. "When you think about it, who's the best recruiter for the Navy you can think of? David Robinson. He's called the Admiral, for goodness sake. The attention that we get in our primary demographic to have someone playing sports who's in the Army, that's where (we) in the Army see the advantage in this program.

About face, indeed.

In March I traveled to West Point and spent two days following Campbell around from one class to another. I saw how hard he worked in class, at school, and as a soldier. Most importantly I saw that while Campbell was a very skilled football player it represented a small part of his personality and an even smaller portion of the four years he’d spent training to be a solider in our nation's military. I talked to his classmates at West Point and heard how eager they were to have one of their own representing the Academy in the NFL. Now, with one bad decision reached the day before his dream became a reality, the Army has stripped away that opportunity from Caleb Campbell.

Campbell is not going to fight the change in this policy because he’s a soldier and he believes his first duty is to his superiors. That’s admirable. What isn’t admirable is when a superior officer screws up and forces subordinates to pay the price for their mistakes. And let’s face it, the Army screwed up. Royally. They pulled the proverbial rug out from under an existing policy after several parties had relied on their policy. If Campbell was a civilian and he sued in a civil court based on this fact pattern, he’d win. There's a decent chance that if the right judge heard his case in a civilian court, the judge would issue a temporary restraining order to stop the Army from changing their policy after everyone relied upon it to their detriment.

As a soldier Cambpell could have an actionable claim because he relied upon an existing Army policy. As a sophomore many schools encouraged Campbell to transfer and play football for them. But the Army, and Coach Bobby Ross in particular, persuaded Campbell that he should stay because graduating from West Point would mean something, be a true accomplishment. Unlike other athletes from football factories who graduated without having to put any effort into earning their degree, Campbell, a soldier of character, would earn his degree and be proud of his accomplishment on his graduation day.

Point being, the Army dangled this policy as a carrot to persuade Campbell that he could have the best of both worlds, a great education and, potentially if he was good enough, a career as a professional football player. After his sophomore year, Campbell could have left West Point and gone anywhere in the country without owing the Army anything. But he didn’t. Caleb Campbell kept his promise to the Army—sadly the Army didn’t keep their promise to him. So in my mind, Campbell has an actionable claim, but he’s too good of a soldier to call the Army on their duplicity.

But what about the Lions? The Army informed the NFL that Campbell was eligible to play this fall in 2008. It’s why the Lions drafted him. Campbell himself knew there was skepticism from NFL teams about his eligibility and that’s why he had the Army notify teams of their existing policy. Now, interestingly, the Detroit Lions actually have a legal claim against the United States Army rooted in contract law. The Lions could sue the Army arguing that the Army is breaching their promise that Campbell was eligible to be drafted. After all, draft picks have a value and if they couldn’t draft Campbell to play football the Lions could have used their 7th round pick to take any other college player in the country. Not only has the Army pulled the rug out from underneath Campbell, but they’ve also screwed the Lions in the process.

Now, the Lions aren’t likely to sue the Army over Campbell because the NFL is patriotic. And patriotism in the NFL’s mind means blindly accepting anything that the Army does — be that claiming that Pat Tillman was the victim of terrorists or allowing one of their lawfully drafted players to be sent to war. To do otherwise would be bad publicity.

So now the Army has created a double storm for itself, they’re damned in both directions, fighting a two front war. They’ve managed to anger everyone without solving any actual problem. The reality is Campbell’s service as an individual soldier is much more valuable from a public relations perspective than it is from a soldiering one. You and I can clearly see that. But we aren’t Caleb Campbell’s superiors. Ultimately Caleb Campbell is a soldier. And, unfortunately for him, a soldier doesn’t get to choose which orders to follow."
This article read as a person with an issues with the Goverment, war etc... and used the Campbell story to take jabs at them.
firstdown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 10:53 AM   #29
Special Teams
 
Miller101's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 362
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Whether you like this or not. You can't deny that Campbell got shafted! One day before camp!?!?!? ONE FREAKIN DAY BEFORE CAMP!!!!

DAYUM!!! The army could at least use some freakin lubrication as they're shafting him!!!
Miller101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 11:28 AM   #30
Playmaker
 
GhettoDogAllStars's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Denver
Age: 32
Posts: 2,761
Re: Caleb Campbell -- No longer allowed to play.

Quote:
Originally Posted by firstdown View Post
Congressmen are elected and if the people keep electing people who waist our money then its the peoples fault!!
Too true.
__________________
To succeed in the world it is not enough to be stupid, you must also be well-mannered.
GhettoDogAllStars is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site is not officially affiliated with the Washington Redskins or the NFL.
Page generated in 0.52366 seconds with 9 queries

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0 RC5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25